Buaine na Gaoithe at Magee

It was perhaps meteorologicaly appropriate that there was a fresh autumnal breeze blowing and a multicoloured palate of leaves were rustling outside. The performance that was about to be witnessed by a generous gathering in the Great Hall of the University of Ulster’s Magee College campus is entitled Buaine na Gaoithe, which roughly translates as the swiftness of the wind. The piece has recently been described by it’s composer on the BBC’s John Total Show “A journey that allows you to get out of time”.

The performance was part of the Music@one at the Ulster University’s Magee College campus. Soprano Liz Pearse, Flutist Chelsea Czuchra and Harpist Lindsay Huffington, better known to some as The Damselfly Trio came together to perform the musical collaboration between composer Ryan Molloy and poet Martin Dyar. Given the weather on the day this piece was performed it was apt that wind and string instruments were brought together along with a voice that varied between a soft gentle breeze and a strong powerful storm.

Buaine na Gaoithe is broken into five movements, each one of these movements representative of each of the five poems written by Martin Dyer. The first one A Waiting Tree was comprised of the full trio, the second movement .\n. It wouldn\’t be recommendedIn Gortnagran was a simple vocal recital of the poem in question. The third movement A Merlin in the Sheefreys is a spoken word piece accompanied by the harp and the final movement Her Crossing comprises of the full ensemble.

It could be said that thqqqere’s something rather Avant Garde and new age about this piece as a whole. It perhaps wouldn’t be recommended to someone who is new to classical music. But as you are sitting there on an otherwise riotously blustery day, you can’t help but find yourself in a moment of peaceful serenity.

The performance is also part of an Irish tour which takes in Belfast, Portaferry, Athy, Dublin, Maynooth, Derry, Limerick and Castle are.

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Film makers of the future bring screen to life

From serious documentary to comedy reflecting student life to vampires in the middle of rural Ireland, it was all to be seen at the second annual showcase of the BSc in Media Arts of the University of Ulster’s Magee campus. Speaking ahead of the showcase course director Tom Maguire spoke of the immense level of talent generated by students on the course. He also spoke of the newly opened creative industries institute which will pull together resources across academic and industry-based companies to create better opportunities for new graduates within the creative industries.

In all there were eight short films on show covering a number of a wide range of themes and issues. Although not all of the film’s on show are dedicated to hard hitting issues, what is noticeable is that the students; although not all local, have made their work from within the local community and in many cases about the local community. It would be unfair for Culture Journal to single out any one of these in particular for praise or criticism. Suficit to say that the quality was indeed reflective of professor Maguire’s high praise, the films on display showed a level of quality, imagination and creativity that bodes well for the future of local talent in the northwest.