Tides makes waves in London

Tides, a documentary about the river Foyle in Derry by Italian director, and some time Derry native, Alessandro Negrini has gained yet more success; this time at the Gold Movie Awards in London where it won Best Documentary. 

At the event in London’s historic Regent Cinema where Negrini rubbed shoulders with the likes of Billy Zane and Sadie Frost, the normally humble Negrini admitted that he allowed himself a certain amount of pride and excitement at the film’s recent achievements, 

“I hope that my film continues to infect people with the desire to listen to their forgotten dreams; to reserect what they have put away in drawers years ago and forgotten about. I hope that in my own poetic way I have helped to tell the story of some of the things that have been put in those drawers. That I have reserected forgotten dreams for people”.

Tides has continued to make a big impression on audience’s across the world; this being the twelfth award it has collected. Negrini, together with his production team of Director of photography Oddgeir Saether, Editor  Stuart Sloan, music by Chris Ciampoli and narration of Emma Taylor have won, among others; the main prize at A Film for Peace Film Festival in the United States, the award for best cinematography at the Sole Luna Film Festival in Palermo, the award for best documentary at the Malta International Film Festival, the award for best documentary at the Mediteran Film Festival in Bosnia, the best screenplay at The Tehran Film Festival,  and The Parma International Music Film Festival. It can only be hoped that film festivals and awards in Ireland can take notice of this truely mezmorising film.

To read Culture Journal Ireland’s review of Tides visit https://culturejournalireland.com/2017/05/09/a-memorable-night-for-a-mesmerising-film-about-a-unique-river/ or follow the links via our archives. 

For more information on Tides visit http://www.alessandronegrini.com

Advertisements

In search of the lost moment

The year 1968 was a year of revolution. From Philadelphia, to Paris to Prague people were on the march demanding their rights; no more were people willing to experience discrimination. The Lost Moment is an exhibition of photos from a number of flashpoints throughout the world. The exhibition starts with an immensely sized photo of Martin Luther King’s March to Selma Alabama in March 1965; one of the most decisive moments in the American civil rights movement. The photo’s symbolism is as immense as it’s stature and is the beginning of a well thought out exhibition. The collection of photographs, taken by some of the leading photojournalist’s of the 1960’s include photographs from not only the United States but also flashpoint areas throughout Europe including Paris during the student protests there, as well as Prague and Warsaw during protests against soviet control; protests which were so ruthlessly put down, and London, which has seen protests against several issues throughout the world. The photos in this exhibition are so atmospheric that they transport you in time and place. You can feel the tension, taste the air, drenched in smoke and fear. Juxtapo alongside these photos of far off places are ones which are more familiar to local audiences. From October 1968 with the start of the civil rights movement in Northern Ireland to the attempted march from Belfast to Derry, The Lost Moment presents parallels between what was happening locally with what was happening in international cities throughout the world.

For some, these photographs and posters will bring back memories, for others they are bring to life what has only been previously heard anecdotally. The fact that the exhibition is being housed in a building which once housed the soldiers who were brought on to the streets where many of these same protests took place is an irony which surely cannot be lost on the audience. The Lost Moment, or at least part thereof will be on display during the Earigal Arts Festival in the Regional Cultural Centre in Letterkenny Co. Donegal before moving on towards the end of the year to the photography gallery in Temple Bar, Dublin for the last few months of the year.