Future film talent gets its chance to shine at Brunswick Cinebowl

Local budding cinematic talent was on display this afternoon (Monday) as the BSc in Cinematic Arts final year students at University of Ulster”s Magee campus in Derry showed their work to an enthusiastic audience at the city’s Brunswick Cinebowl.
Now in it’s third year, the annual end of year show put on display a number of technically accomplished pieces from across nearly every genre.
This wasn’t your usual cluncky, rusty obviously amateurish work we’re talking about but some of the best work to be seen at any showcase and any festival; and the good news is that the best is yet to come from this fantastic group of students.

In all there were ten shorts screened on the day.
First up was Stanza with cinematography by Conor Shearer. This was a scenic tour de force with rugid landscapes of wild growing fields amd stormy seas, making the most of local coastal scenery.

Un Amour en Marcaeaux , directed by Tiarnan Hatchell, sees two ex-lovers meeting up again after some time apart. The two reminice about old times and contemplate getting back together. Shot entirely in black and white and with a sound quality reminiscent of continental classics, this is a film with lotsa of potential for more.

The Weeping in the Woods by Jason Reilly is a haunting tale of an isolated Knight making his way through a forest, he is haunted by the spirits in the woods who torment and hound him. 

Male Condition, directed by David McIntyre is a filmatic scream for help for mankind, cuting together image after image of man’s struggle to define itself. The imagery used in this film is as powerful as any seen. With a voice crying out from the screen, “existance remains frail” “ask them to apologise for a past they did not commit”. The film is a cry which every man can identify with, screaming in a load and terrifying voice.

With Sophie Donnelly directing and Ella Mc Daid producing Hurt to Hope is a heart felt documentary about the work of Foyle Women’s Aid directed by Sinead Donnelly. This is a well made documentary espoicing the often undervalued and overlooked work by Foyle Women’s Aid. Without sensation or sentimentality it details the experiences of those who use this vital community resource and is sure to attract much needed attention to this vital resource.

Good Mournin’ produced by Shannon Noble and directed by Peter Shiels begins with an opening sequence of Margaret Thatcher juxtoposed with scenes of torture and graphic footage of a figure tied to a chair, blood dripping from the mouth which, although not gratuatous are reminoisncent of scenese from a Luis Bunuel film. The narrative involves a couple from a mixed background, the girl has brough her boyfriend home to meet her mother, the narrative subtly displays how one slight slip, one unguarded comment gives the game away.

In Losing Your Way , edited by Ruari Campbell, the audience sees Michael, an everyday twenty one year old given a birthday surprise by his friends, in time he indeed looses his way and descendes into a drug habit which his girlfriend struggles to get him off. In time, with his life spiralling out of control and his girlfriend ready to give up on him he eventually sees the light. This is a well made social commentary on the damage that can and quite often is doing in many of the communities that these students are living in.


Slayer is one for all the Game of Thrones fans out there, a medievil drama where the hereoin has to fight ghouls and villain in order to saver her brother from the dragons layer. With no expense obviously spared in the costume and props department this is a well made medieval drame that is bound to please even the most unenthusiastic Game of Thrones fan.


Lost Memories, directed by Conor Barrow, is a story which no doubt many can relate to. An elderly woman sits by a window on her own, with noone to talk to. After she wanders out into the garden, a stumble and a fall, she is heloed by what at first hand seems like a care worker, but is in fact her daughter. The daughter it would seem is being left on her own to look after the mother. As the narrative progresses we discover that the mother was once a talented photogrpher and encouraged her children to take up the same passtime. However since the death of her husband the woman has begun to loose hope. In time we find out that the daughter is the only one saving the mother from going into care. Under preasure from her brother, the daughter can’t cope on her own and eventually the inevitable choice is faced with. Lost Memories is a strong social conscience message driven film. It teaches us that behind every old and frail person who has lost their way there is still a human being and it is difficult to know how to cope when you find yourself in this sort of situation; there are no easy answers.


The final screening on offer at the event was a comedy western by the title of Fun Times in Sinister Pines, directed and produced by Benjamin Porter and Caolan Brolly, a fun, well shot comedy which sees Argyle Magee, Stabi McStab Face, Goldilocks and several other sinister characters battle it out for control of the west. It was a perfect ending to the afternoon and everyone left with a smile on their face.

Of course no film event could take place without an awards ceremony and this was no exception. Winning a prize for his poiniant drama about an elderly women with dementia and her daughter’s struggles to take care of her was Conor Barrow, a fitting winner.

Anyone reading this cannot begin to imagine just how high the standard was at this event and it can only be hoped that these graduates can go on and be successful in their future endevours. Culture Journal Ireland looks forward to being invited to view future work by several members of this class in the near future and believes that screen talent coming out of the North West of Ireland is capable of mixing with the best out there. Students can be assured that if you ever need the spotlight shone on your future projects Culture Journal Ireland will be there to do it.